PENSIONS 

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Please see a range of pension providers below. Use the table to compare which provider and account type suits your plan. Before signing up to a pensions plan, consider what your financial goals are. Compare which type of pensions plan might suit your needs – do you want to place a portion of money in stocks and shares? Will you want a joint-life pension plan or a single pension plan? Remember personal pensions and stakeholder pensions have differences. Don't forget to find out what, if any, pension schemes are offered by your employer. In some schemes, employers contribute to your fund or seek a provider on your behalf. Once you have found a provider and pension plan which suits you, simply click on the Apply button to be taken through the next steps. Always make sure you fully aware of how your pension will work and what the terms and conditions are before you commit. If you have any questions don’t be afraid to ask them.

Search Report: ALL  Personal Pensions  SIPP Accounts  Stakeholder Pensions  Child Stakeholder Pensions

If you wish to speak to someone: Contact Us or Enquiry Line: +44 (0) 207 386 5300

PROVIDERTYPE

TYPE

Type of Pension

MIN INVESTMENTS

MIN INVESTMENTS

Minimum Investment

SIPP OPTION

SIPP OPTION

Self-Invested Personal Pension Plan

RATE

RATE

Interest rate on savings

FEES / CHARGES

FEES / CHARGES

Fees Charges

FUND OPTIONS

FUND OPTIONS

Number of fund options

CONDITIONS

CONDITIONS

Conditions of pension fund

FEATURES

FEATURES

Pension fund features

SUITABLE

SUITABLE

Who the fund is suitable for

TERMS

TERMS

Terms and conditions of the pension

SPREAD

RESTRICTIONS

Restrictions for applicants

MORE INFO

Fidelity SIPP
Fidelity SIPP

Self-Invested Personal Pensions£100 per monthWith your own money, Your employer or Ltd. company contributingVaries on fundUp to 0.95%Ready-made funds - Full fund rangeConditions

Conditions

Please remember, the value of investments can fall as well as rise, so you may get back less than you invest

Features

Features

You receive income tax relief on money put into a pension.

Suitable For

Suitable For

SIPPs are available to anyone aged under 75 who is resident in the UK for tax purposes.

Terms and Conditions

Terms

Eligibility to invest in a SIPP will depend on personal circumstances, and all tax rules may change in the future.

Restrictions

Restrictions

You will not normally have access to money you have invested in a SIPP until the age of 55.

Fidelity SIPP
The Fidelity SIPP is an easy way to get saving. Just invest a single lump sum, or from just £100 a month. We offer one low cost service fee with no additional charges including no exit, switching or transfer fees. DETAIL INFORMATION >>Services

Services

Online Access


Advantages

Advantages

1. One low cost fee – our typical service fee is just 0.35%
2. 24/7 access – via our online account management system, and mobile apps
3. A wide choice – we give you access to a wide range of investment options with low ongoing fund charges starting from just 0.07%, as well as tools to help you find the right funds for you
4. Great service – we are committed to providing excellent customer service, from our UK based contact centre to investment guidance on our website.


Disadvantages

Disadvantages

1.Fund management charges will still apply 

2.Fidelity do not give financial advice.

AJ Bells
AJ Bells

Self-Invested Personal Pensions£20 per monthYouinvest SIPP0.20% per annumFrom £20 p.a.Choose from over 4,000 fundsConditions

Conditions

Please note the value of investments, and any income from them can go down as well as up and you may not get back your original investment.

Features

Features

You will get access to an incredibly wide range of investment options and can deal from as little as £4.95, and you will never pay more than £9.95 per online deal.

Suitable For

Suitable For

SIPPs are a type of pension suitable for investors who are comfortable making their own investment decisions.

Terms and Conditions

Terms

Once you reach age 55 you will have access to your whole pension pot and can choose how to use your pension in your retirement.

Restrictions

Restrictions

Only UK residents can apply

AJ Bells
Keep control over how your pension is invested and make changes whenever you like - and once you have reached the age of 55 you can have access to your money and choose how you want to use it. Sign up now online! DETAIL INFORMATION >>Services

Services

Manage your account online, easy application


Advantages

Advantages

1.Low annual custody charge 2.Low cost dealing 3.Manage account online


Disadvantages

Disadvantages

Fees and charges might apply

If you wish to speak to someone: Contact Us or Enquiry Line: +44 (0) 207 386 5300

Compare Pensions

Pensions: The biggest investment you will ever make

Saving for retirement is one of the biggest investments that people make and the most popular way to save for your retirement is in a pension. A pension is an income that you will receive when you retire. It is a regular savings contribution and a long term investment. Many people choose to ignore the idea that one day they will be old but everyone needs to plan for when they retire, especially as people are living longer. The sooner you start paying into a pension the higher your income in retirement will be. To encourage people to put money away for their retirement, the Government provides tax relief on pension contributions. When you pay into your pension fund, the Government adds the tax that you have paid, or would pay, on that money. However, there are restrictions on how much you can contribute, depending on what type of pension scheme you have.

When can you access your pension?

In the UK the earliest age you can take your pension is 55 but most people choose to wait until they are 60 or 65 but you do not have to retire from work to get your pension benefits. You can put off taking your pension until you are 65. There are certain situations where you can take your pension before you are 55. Your pension scheme provider will tell you what your scheme allows. There are three main types of pension. The first is the State Pension which is provided by the government. However, many people will not be able to live just on this amount alone so if you think you are likely to need more than this then you should consider a retirement plan. Some employers will provide a salary-related pension and lastly there are personal pensions which you pay money into. You can build up your own pension through a private pension plan or put a portion of your earnings into a company pension scheme.

Investing in a Pension scheme

Generally speaking your pension fund is invested and when you retire the money you have accumulated over the years is used to buy an annuity which will provide an income for the rest of your life. The amount of this income depends on a number of aspects, including the amount you have contributed, how the money was invested, the age you are when you take out your pension, you gender, health and how much you get for the annuity. The final value of your pension fund will depend mainly on how much has been paid in and how well the fund’s investments have performed.

Where are pensions available from?

Personal pensions are available from banks, building societies and life insurance companies who will invest your savings on your behalf. You can save as much as you want with a personal pension and you can pay regular monthly amounts or a lump sum to the pension provider. Personal pensions are suitable for those who are self-employed, people who are not working but can afford to pay for a pension and employees whose employers do not offer company pension scheme. To choose the right pension provider your decision will mainly depend on how much you can afford to save for your pension. Make sure you know what the rules on making contributions are and how the money will be invested.

Advantages and disadvantages of pensions

Pensions come with tax breaks. It is therefore a tax-efficient way of saving to secure a regular income when you retire. Remember however that tax rules can change over the years and this may affect your pension fund. Personal pension funds usually invest your money in shares and although there are certain risks involved, shares usually deliver a better return than cash savings over a long period. In most cases the money in your pension fund can’t be accessed until you retire, so you won’t be tempted to spend it.

A disadvantage is that you can’t access you money until you are near retirement, you can’t access the money if you need it in a financial emergency. As personal pension funds are typically invested, the eventual size of your pension cannot be guaranteed. If for example you have chosen to invest in shares, these could end up performing badly and you could end up with less of a return than you hoped for. It is also important to watch out for charges. For a basic pension you should expect to pay a single annual management charge. There may be other administrative costs depending on what type of pension you have and which provider you choose.

PENSIONS - LATEST NEWS News and Charts

ISAs, Pensions and Income Tax: The Autumn Statement Explained

20 December 2013
Which Way To Pay

Chancellor George Osborne announced the Autumn Statement last week, how will this affect your pension, ISA and income tax?

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What are the benefits of getting a pension? Which Way To Pay investigate the change in state pensions

19 August 2013
Which Way To Pay

With the recent changes in pension legislation, it is of paramount importance that you research your options carefully.

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Think Pensions

26 September 2012 16:00
Which Way to Pay

New Product! If you are over 55 and have a need for cash you could release money from your company or personal pension now. Think Pensions can help you locate a company who will perform a free, no obligation review of your Pension to see if releasing a Tax-Free Cash sum is right for you.

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Breakdown in UK Private Sector Pensions

03 January 2012
Which Way to Pay

There has been a dramatic collapse in private sector pension schemes as across the UK companies are withdrawing from bolstering employee pension schemes.

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Public Sector Strike Begins

30 November 2011
Which Way to Pay

Today sees public sector workers all over the country participating in a strike over pensions and is said to be the biggest walkout for a generation by unions.

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